Our Spices & Herbs

Allspice Berries.jpg

Allspice Berries

Allspice combines the flavors of nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, and pepper all rolled into one berry. It is indigenous to the West Indies. Allspice is an essential part of the jerk spice blend and goes well with fruit and vegetable dishes.

Shop Here

Amchur.jpg

Amchur

Amchur is a spice derived from the evergreen mango, which adds a fruity, tangy flavor to foods. It is native to India and Southeast Asia. It is good with vegetable and bean dishes.

Shop Here

Anise Seeds.jpg

Anise Seeds

Anise has a sweet licorice type flavor with some peppery undertones. It is native to the Middle East and Mediterranean region. It goes well with fish, fruity, and root vegetables dishes.

Shop Here

Annatto.jpg

Annatto (Achiote)

Annatto has an earthy, flowery, sweet and peppery aroma, and is native to South America. This spice is often used in Caribbean cooking and added to fish, chicken, rice and vegetable dishes.

Shop Here

Basil.jpg

Basil

Basil is a common ingredient in Italian and Mediterranean dishes of all sorts and is native to that region. It has a flavor profile of sweetness and slight spiciness, combined with undertones of cloves and pepper.

Shop Here

Organic Bay Leaves.jpg

Bay Leaves (Organic)

These dry bay leaves are native to the Mediterranean region. They add a spicy, little bitter, balsamic type flavor to a dish. The leaves should be removed before serving. They go well with tomatoes, rice, beans, fish, lamb, chicken, beef, stews, and soups.

Shop Here

Black Cardamom Pods.jpg

Black Cardamom

Native to India and Nepal, and has a smoky, earthy, pine-like flavor, with bacon undertones. The flavor is more potent than green cardamom and is used in rice pilaf, meat and vegetables curries, and in soups and stews.

Shop Here

Cacao Powder.jpg

Cacao Powder

This is the purist form of chocolate and originates in Central Mexico. It is a 100% cacao without any sugar added, so it will have a little more bitter flavor than expected. It is wonderful to use in baking cookies, brownies, and cakes or in hot chocolate, and is an essential ingredient for mole.

Shop Here

Caraway Seed.jpg

Caraway Seeds

Caraway is most recognizable as the flavor that gives rye bread its unique taste. It is native to Central Europe, North Africa, and the Mediterranean. It is very popular in German and Scandinavian cooking. It goes well in breads and cakes, and in noodle, cabbage, and pork dishes.

Shop Here

Celery Seeds.jpg

Celery Seeds

Celery seed has a parsley-like, grassy, slightly bitter flavor and is native to many regions around the world. It is good in stews, soups, tomato juice, salad dressings, sauerkraut, and stuffing.

Shop Here

Chives.jpg

Chives

Chives are a member of the onion family but with a more delicate flavor. It grows all over Northern Europe and North America. It is a wonderful addition to cream cheese, sour cream, cottage cheese, salad dressings, soups, tomato sauce, and egg and vegetable dishes.

Shop Here

Cinnamon (Ceylon).jpg

Cinnamon (Ceylon)

This is the “true cinnamon” and is a lighter, less sweet yet more intense flavor than the cinnamon most people in the U.S. have experienced. It is one of the world’s most popular baking spices used by many cultures. It is the dried bark of an evergreen tree from the laurel family.

Shop Here

Cinnamon (Indonesian Korintje Cassia).jpg

Cinnamon (Indonesian Korintje Cassia)

This is the “cinnamon” with which most people in the U.S. are familiar, and it has the recognizable pronounced warm, spicy, sweet, pungent aroma. It is one of the world’s most popular baking spices used by many cultures. It is also the dried bark of an evergreen tree from the laurel family. Cassia and cinnamon are used interchangeably in the United States.

Shop Here

Cinnamon (Vietnamese).jpg

Cinnamon (Vietnamese)

Vietnamese cinnamon (really cassia) is considered by the experts to be the most aromatic of the cinnamons and cassias. The cinnamon oil content (that gives the spice its unique aroma and flavor) is the highest of all the cinnamons, often making it the choice of many bakers.

Shop Here

Cloves.jpg

Cloves

Native to Southeast Asia, cloves have a warm, sharp, bitter, peppery taste with hints of fruit. It goes well with vegetables and pork, and in slow cooked soups and stews. It is a very pungent spice that should be used sparingly.

Shop Here

Coriander Seeds.jpg

Coriander Seeds

The leaf of this plant is known as cilantro, which has a different flavor than the seed. The seed has a citrusy, mellow, sweet warm mild flavor, which is often used in spice blends, pickling, stews, soups, vegetable dishes, fruit desserts, and on chicken or fish.

Shop Here

Crystallized Ginger.jpg

Crystalized Ginger

This spice is also called “candied ginger” and has a sweet spicy flavor. It is most often used in baking cookies, cakes, and muffins. This crystalized ginger is made from ginger, sugar and fruit juice.

Shop Here

Cumin Seeds.jpg

Cumin Seeds

Cumin has a distinct aromatic bittersweet, spicy, nutty flavor and is grown in India, Turkey and China. It is found in many cultures’ foods around the world and is essential in Indian curries, Middle Eastern, Mexican, and North African dishes.

Shop Here

Dill Seed.jpg

Dill Seed

Dill seed is related to the celery family and used in German, Russian, Indian, Indonesian, and Scandinavian cooking. It is a staple in spices used to make dill pickles. It goes well sprinkled over vegetable dishes.

Shop Here

Fennel Seed.jpg

Fennel Seeds

The seed has a mild anise licorice flavor, and is grown in the Mediterranean, Central Europe and India. It used often in Italian cooking in sausage and tomato sauces for pasta, and in stews, lamb, pork, and chicken dishes, and in fish soups.

Shop Here

Fenugreek.jpg

Fenugreek Seeds

This spice has a nutty bittersweet taste and is often used in curries and Middle Eastern cooking. It goes well with vegetables, fish and lamb.

Shop Here

File Powder.jpg

File Powder

This is the essential ingredient in Gumbo and is used for thickening as well as flavor. The powder is made from ground dried sassafras leaves.

Shop Here

Galangal Root Powder.jpg

Galangal Root Powder

Galangal is essential in Southeast Asian dishes and is often mistaken for ginger, though galangal has a much more intense flavor.

Shop Here

Ginger Powder.jpg

Ginger Powder

Ginger has a peppery, lemony flavor with some fiery undertones. It is an essential ingredient in Asian cooking. When cooking with powdered ginger, 1/8 teaspoon = 1 Tablespoon of fresh ginger.

Shop Here

Granulated Garlic.jpg

Granulated Garlic

Garlic is a spice that is used in most cuisines around the world and is related to leeks, onions, and shallots. This garlic comes from California, which is sometimes considered the garlic capital of the world. When cooking with granulated garlic, 1/4 teaspoon = 1 clove of fresh garlic

Shop Here

Granulated Onion.jpg

Granulated Onion

Onion is one of the most commonly known vegetables and when dried is used as a spice. It is used in many dishes: stews, soups, sprinkled over pizza, and as rub for meats. When cooking, 1 tablespoon of granulated onion = a small onion.

Shop Here

Green Cardamom Pods.jpg

Green Cardamon Pods

Green cardamom is indigenous to Southeast Asia and Central America. With a flavor profile of smokiness, lemony, flowery, and bittersweet, it is an essential ingredient in curries, masalas, pilafs, dahls, and adds a unique taste to puddings and ice cream.

Shop Here

Juniper Berries.jpg

Juniper Berries

This is the spice that gives gin its flavor. It has a woody, bittersweet flavor that produces a slight burning sensation. It is most popular in Central and Northern Europe as a spice on meat and game.

Shop Here

Lavender.jpg

Lavender

This culinary lavender flower is grown in France and it is most often used in desserts and in marinades for poultry, rabbit, and lamb. It is potent so a little can go a long way.

Shop Here

Lemongrass.jpg

Lemongrass

This spice is an essential ingredient in Thai cooking. It has a spicy, tart, citrusy flavor.

Shop Here

Lemon Peel.jpg

Lemon Peel

This dried zest has the fragrant, potent, flavor of a lemon. It goes well in marinades and salad dressings and with chicken, fish, rice, and vegetable dishes and in desserts.

Shop Here

Lime Peel.jpg

Lime Peel

This dried zest has the fragrant, potent, flavor of a lime. It goes well in marinades and salad dressings and with chicken, fish, rice, and vegetable dishes and in desserts.

Shop Here

Mace.jpg

Mace

Mace and nutmeg come from the same plant. Mace blades are the lacy orange-red threads that surround the nutmeg seed. The blades are often added to stews and soups but are removed before serving. They add a floral, peppery, clove flavor to a dish.

Shop Here

Marjoram Leaf.jpg

Marjoram Leaf

Marjoram is closely related to oregano and mint and is native to the Mediterranean region.

Shop Here

Mediterranean Organo.jpg

Mediterranean Oregano

Mediterranean oregano is also known as Greek oregano and comes from that region. It is related to marjoram and has a pungent sweet, sharp, and slightly bitter taste. Mediterranean oregano has more floral undertones to it than Mexican oregano, which is earthier in flavor. It is a staple in Italian, Greek, Turkish and other Mediterranean cuisines.

Shop Here

Mexican Oregano.jpg

Mexican Oregano

Mexican oregano has an intense, earthy, grassy flavor with hints of citrus. It is related to lemon verbena. It is a staple in Mexican cooking, especially bean and rice dishes, and in mole. It should be used sparingly because of its strong flavor.

Shop Here

Mint.jpg

Mint (Spearmint)

This spearmint, the most commonly used type of mint, is native to the Mediterranean and Southern European regions. Mint has a mellow sweet and sharp flavor with a hint of lemon. It goes well in drinks, salads, yogurt, chocolate, and lamb dishes.

Shop Here

Mustard Seed (Brown).jpg

Brown Mustard Seeds

These seeds are stronger in flavor than yellow (white) mustard seeds and have more of a bitter hot flavor profile. They are a key ingredient in many Indian curries.

Shop Here

Mustard Seed (Yellow).jpg

Yellow Mustard Seeds

This is the mustard with which most people in the U.S. are familiar. Mustard seeds have no apparent aroma until ground, which releases a pungent earthy acrid aroma. Dry mustard is ground mustard seeds. Yellow mustard seeds (also known as white mustard seeds) are used in making deviled eggs, ham dishes, hollandaise sauce, barbeque sauce, and curries.

Shop Here

Whole Indonesian Nutmeg.jpg

Nutmeg

Nutmeg and mace come from the same plant, and the dried seed of the plant is nutmeg. Like mace, it has a warm yet woody, clove -like bitter taste. Nutmeg is an essential part of apple pie and pumpkin spice blends, and is often used in soups, squash casseroles, and sprinkled on eggnog.

Shop Here

Orange Peel.jpg

Orange Peel

This dried zest has the fragrant, potent flavor of an orange. It goes well in marinades and salad dressings and with chicken, fish, rice, and vegetables.

Shop Here

Hungarian Sweet Paprika.jpg

Paprika (Hungarian - Sweet)

Paprika is in the chili pepper family and has a rich, sweet somewhat spicy flavor, though it is not hot. It is used in stews, casseroles, and vegetable dishes, and as rubs on chicken, fish, veal, and pork, and of course in Hungarian goulash.

Shop Here

Smoked Paprika.jpg

Paprika (Smoked - Hot)

Paprika is in the chili pepper family, and this paprika has a rich, sweet, hot and smoky flavor. For smoked paprika, the paprika chilis are slow smoked over oak planks yielding a smooth smoky finish. It is used in stews, casseroles, and vegetable dishes and as a rub on poultry, veal and pork. A little of this paprika goes a long way.

Shop Here

Poppy Seeds.jpg

Poppy Seeds

Poppy seeds have a nutty aroma and are often used in baking, salad dressings, and on vegetables. Culinary poppy seeds are not the same poppy plant used in the production of opium.

Shop Here

Rosemary.jpg

Rosemary

Rosemary is related to basil, mint, oregano and sage. It is native to the Mediterranean regions and used in many cuisines. Rosemary has a strong woody, minty, somewhat peppery flavor that goes well with beef, pork, chicken, lamb, game, and on vegetables. When cooking with dried rosemary, 1/4 teaspoon = 1 teaspoon of the fresh herb.

Shop Here

Rose Petals.jpg

Rose Petals

Rose petals are popular in Middle Eastern cooking, particularly Persian cuisine. They can also be used to make tea and rose water. Rose petals have a floral, earthy slightly sweet flavor.

Shop Here

Saffron.jpg

Saffron

This is the most expensive spice in the world because it is all hand processed, very labor intensive, and with limited availability. It is the dried stigma of the saffron crocus flower. This true saffron is from Iran and has a deep purplish red color and is the highest rated category of saffron. Saffron has a distinct musky, floral, honey-like earthy, slightly bitter flavor. It should be used sparingly; a little bit goes a long way. It goes well in rice, chicken, fish, and lentil dishes.

Shop Here

Sage.jpg

Sage (Rubbed)

Sage is popular in European and Greek cooking and gets its “rubbed” name from the process where the plant leaves are rubbed to get the fluffy consistency. It has a musky, peppery, earthy flavor and is used in many dishes, such as: soups, pasta, and all sorts of meats and vegetables. When used in cooking, 1 Tablespoon of fresh sage = 1 teaspoon of dried sage.

Shop Here

Toasted Sesame Seeds.jpg

Sesame Seeds (Toasted)

Indigenous to North Africa and Indonesia, these white seeds are toasted so they can be used directly in recipes. They have a nutty earthy flavor, which blend well in vegetable, noodles, fish, and chicken dishes.

Shop Here

Star Anise.jpg

Star Anise

A whole star anise pod is one of the most beautiful looking spices; it is in the shape of an irregular eight- pointed star. It is indigenous to Vietnam and China and it has a warm sweet licorice flavor. Star Anise is often used in baked goods, soups, and stews, and is one of the key ingredients in the Chinese Five Spice Blend.

Shop Here

Sumac.jpg

Sumac

Sumac has a tart astringent flavor and it is most often used in Middle Eastern cooking instead of lemon. It goes well with humus, chicken, vegetables, lamb, seafood and yogurt. It is an essential ingredient in the blend Za’atar.

Shop Here

Summer Savory.jpg

Summer Savoy

This herb has a peppery bite with some resemblance in flavor to mint, thyme, and marjoram. It is native to the Mediterranean region. It goes well in herbed butter, vegetable, chicken and fish dishes, cream sauces, and meat pies.

Shop Here

Tamarind.jpg

Tamarind

This spice has a sweet-sour fruity taste and is often made into a paste form. It is native to tropical Africa but is a key ingredient in South Indian cuisine. It goes well with most vegetables and in chicken, poultry, lamb and lentil dishes.

Shop Here

Tarragon.jpg

Tarragon

This dried herb from France is a key ingredient in Herbs de Provence blend. It has a sweet somewhat minty flavor with hints of licorice. It goes well with fish, chicken, roasted vegetables, tomatoes, eggs and in soups.

Shop Here

Thyme.jpg

Thyme

Thyme is native to the Mediterranean region and North Africa and is related to oregano, marjoram, and sage. It has a piney, peppery, earthy floral flavor and is used in many cuisines, particularly French. Dried thyme can be used in beef, lamb, chicken, egg, fish, pork, and vegetable dishes.

Shop Here

Turmeric.jpg

Turmeric

Turmeric is indigenous to India and has a woody, floral, citrusy, musky, ginger-like flavor. It is an essential ingredient in masalas, curry powders, and the Moroccan spice blend Ras el hanout.

Shop Here

Madagascar Vanilla.jpg

Vanilla (Madagascar)

This is the aroma and taste of true pure vanilla, not what you usually find marked as vanilla in grocery stores. Vanilla comes from three areas of the world: Madagascar, Mexico and Tahiti.

Shop Here

Mexican Vanilla.jpg

Vanilla (Mexican)

This is the aroma and taste of true pure vanilla, not what you usually find marked as vanilla in grocery stores. Vanilla comes from three areas of the world: Madagascar, Mexico and Tahiti. Mexican vanilla has a woody, spicier yet more delicate flavor. It is a staple in a baker’s spice rack.

Shop Here